Highways of Des Moines

Overview
As the capital and largest city of Iowa, Des Moines has traditionally been the state's transportation hub. In the early days of automobile travel, the north-south Jefferson Highway and the east-west River-to-River Road and Great White Way all intersected in Des Moines. When the primary road system was adopted in 1920, Des Moines became the intersection of Primary Roads 1 and 2. Maps from this era are hard to find, and the maps that I have found do not show what streets these primary roads followed. However, the University of Texas' Perry-Castañeda Map Collection has a 1919 map of early auto trail routes in Des Moines. While it is hard to tell what routes each highway followed in the city, these streets were used for highways entering and leaving the city: Beaver Avenue, 6th Street, East 14th Street, Easton Boulevard, North (now University) Avenue, Indianola Avenue, SW 21st Street (now Fleur Drive), and Grand Avenue. The diagonal Hubbell Avenue and Keo(sauqua) Way did not become part of Des Moines' street system until later in the 1920s.
By 1926, the need for a national highway numbering system had arisen, and the US highway system was born. US highways 32 and 65 would intersect in Des Moines, while US 63 would have its north endpoint here. (The intersection where US 63, and later US 163, began was unknown until I discovered the Des Moines Register of October 17, 1926, which had a map of the new highway alignments in Des Moines. After some speculation that it was where Hubbell Avenue split from Grand Avenue, it was really at the intersection of East 14th Street and Grand.)

Several changes were made to numbered highways in Des Moines as a result of the US highway system. The original IA 1 became US 65, IA 2 was split between US 32 (west of downtown) and US 63 (east of downtown), and IA 7 was replaced with US 32 east of downtown but remained intact west of downtown. IA 15, which followed IA 1 from Ames to Des Moines, was dropped north of Ames and renumbered IA 28 south of the intersection of 7th Street and Indianola Avenue. IA 17 became IA 6 from its north endpoint at US 32. In short, five highways — IA 123 (18th Street), IA 7 (7th Street), IA 60 (6th Avenue), US 63 (East 14th Street), and IA 6 (Hubbell Avenue) — ended at Grand Avenue once the renumbering of state highways was finished on October 16, 1926. Of the highways that existed January 1, 1927 (shown below), only US 65 and IA 28 remain in the Des Moines area today.
On April 27, 1931, the front page of the Register mentioned that US 32 would be rerouted from Adel to downtown Des Moines along Hickman Road and IA 7 into downtown rather than along Adel (now Ashworth) Road and Grand Avenue. The change would not take effect until November 19, when the paved road between Waukee and Des Moines opened. The old US 32 remained part of the state highway system until July 1, 1932. (Part of the original US 32 alignment — V Avenue between University Avenue and Ashworth Road on the outskirts of Waukee — remained gravel for more than 75 years after the realignment. It was finally paved by mid-2008, after Waukee annexed the area around V Avenue and renamed it L.A. Grant Parkway.) Grand Avenue west of downtown was dropped from the state highway system for a short time, but in 1932, IA 90 was designated to run along Grand from downtown toward Valley Junction and the village of Commerce to its eventual destination of Dexter. IA 155, which went from Commerce across the Raccoon River and along McKinley Avenue, was also dropped from the state highway system at the same time that US 32 was rerouted. The bridge across the Raccoon was washed out by a flood in 1965 and was never replaced, while parts of McKinley near the airport — which set up in its present location in 1933 — have since been removed.

As paving of US 32 across Iowa was nearing completion, the American Association of State Highway Officials announced that US 32 would become US 6 on December 1, 1931. The designation of US 6 meant that IA 6 needed a new number, so IA 60 was extended across the Grand Avenue bridge to replace IA 6.

The May 3, 1932, Des Moines Tribune noted that a traffic flow change would occur in the area east of Drake University. While all US 6/IA 7 traffic had previously used 21st Street and Carpenter Avenue to go between Forest Avenue and Keosauqua Way, westbound traffic would follow 19th Street between Keo and Forest while eastbound traffic would continue to use 21st and Carpenter. On August 19, 1931, the Highway Commission approved a rerouting of southbound US 65 (and, presumably, eastbound IA 7) traffic in the downtown area. Southbound US 65 traffic was moved to 9th Street, with US 65 following Mulberry Street between 9th and 7th. (For some time before that, US 65 was moved onto 10th Street after left turns at 7th and Grand were banned. Today, since both streets are one-ways, you can only turn left from westbound Grand to southbound 7th.) Another highway routing change through downtown was approved by the Highway Commission on July 20, 1932, and announced in the July 28 Tribune. Westbound US 6 and northbound US 65 traffic was rerouted onto 5th Street, with US 65 following Mulberry east of 7th.
While plans to reroute US 6 away from downtown altogether were discussed as early as 1932, the Highway Commission stated that a new bridge had to be built across the Des Moines River first. That bridge opened on December 3, 1934, taking US 6 away from downtown and putting it on a shorter and faster route that only had one stoplight at the time, according to the Tribune. IA 7 remained unchanged for the time being, while "City US 6" was designated along US 6's old route into downtown. (Since City US 6 was not officially a state highway, the standalone segments appear in gray on these maps.)

The December 6, 1934, Register mentioned that several changes to the US highway system had been made, and one of those changes was the removal of US 63 from Des Moines. US 163 was designated to replace US 63. US 69 was extended to downtown Des Moines at the same time, but in May of 1935, it followed US 65 from that point through Des Moines to Ames, where it followed the remainder of the original IA 15 all the way into Minnesota. By that time, four highways — City US 6, US 65, US 69, and IA 60 — followed Grand Avenue across the Des Moines River and past the State Capitol. That changed by the end of 1937, as US 65/69 was rerouted onto SE 14th Street across a new bridge to its previous alignment along Indianola Avenue. In return, IA 28 was extended along part of 65/69's old route to end at Grand.

On July 21, 1937, US 163 was demoted to a state highway, IA 163, after the American Association of State Highway Officials began to discourage single-state US highways. However, signs may not have changed right away — newspaper ads for downtown Des Moines merchants' "Bargain Days" in October 1937 told customers to "Pick Your Happy Highway" to head downtown. The ads included markers for every highway in the city at the time, including US 163. The change was definitely done by April 4, 1938, as that day's Tribune showed photos of IA 60, IA 163, and City US 6 markers at the intersection of East 14th and Grand. This change did not receive the publicity that another name change — that of the city of Valley Junction to West Des Moines on January 1, 1938 — received.
On July 22, 1939, IA 64 was extended from Anamosa to Council Bluffs in order to create a single numbered highway from Omaha to Chicago. But rather than go through downtown the way IA 7 did, IA 64 followed US 6 along Douglas, Euclid, and Hubbell Avenues. In 1940, US 65 was rerouted between Colo and Des Moines, creating a triplex between East 14th and Broadway Avenues. The original IA 89, which followed Merle Hay Road from Johnston Station (now the city of Johnston) to Camp Dodge, was replaced by an extension of IA 141 in 1941.

The April 1, 1938, Tribune mentioned plans for a four-lane extension of SE 14th Street from Indianola Avenue to Army Post Road to carry US 65/69 traffic. However, the relocation was not done until August 1942 — likely to improve access to the U.S. Army post at Fort Des Moines during World War II, hence the name "Army Post Road." IA 28 was relocated onto Army Post Road when the new road opened, and the former segment lasted as IA 46 until 1950.

After a 1937 move between Euclid and Grand Avenues, IA 60 was rerouted along 2nd Avenue north of Euclid in December 1942. (Plans for a four-lane road to Ames, running west of US 69, were mentioned in the January 5, 1939, Register, but the segment between Broadway Avenue and IA 160 south of Ankeny did not become four lanes until 1961. Ames wouldn't get a four-lane connection to Des Moines until 1965, when I-35 opened.) IA 60 was also rerouted along University Avenue with a relocated IA 163; IA 90 was then extended along 2nd Avenue to replace part of IA 60. After all the dust was settled, City US 6 was the only highway on the Grand Avenue bridge.
On February 15, 1953, the city of Des Moines adopted a one-way street system through downtown. This system included Grand Avenue and Locust Street between Fleur Drive and East 9th Street, literally in front of the State Capitol. IA 90 and City US 6 were affected by this change. (Many of them are still one-ways today, although Grand and Locust east of 2nd Avenue are two-ways now, and the block of Locust east of Penn(sylvania) Avenue is no longer open to traffic.) A few more one-ways were added on November 10, 1957, particularly 3rd Street and 2nd Avenue. A new IA 46 was created on September 22, 1953, after IA 60 was rerouted along US 65/69 and a new stretch of Army Post Road.
The biggest changes to Des Moines' highway system were yet to come. On November 12, 1955, the Register published a map that showed plans for a US 69 bypass of Des Moines that would have run all the way southward to Osceola. On June 22, 1956, Congress passed the highway act that created the Interstate highway system. Construction soon began on "Super 6" and "Super 69," which in 1957 were numbered I-80 and I-35 respectively. A planned 14-mile freeway through Des Moines also became part of the Interstate system.

The first Interstate highway segment opened on September 21, 1958, as I-35 opened from Douglas Avenue (IA 132 at the time) to the Cumming exit. The segment from Douglas Avenue to Merle Hay Road opened November 9; a relocated segment of IA 141 also opened from Granger to the "Rider Corner" interchange (where there was once a village called Rider that has since been annexed by Urbandale) at I-35/80. While the former IA 141 segment north of Camp Dodge was turned over to the county, IA 401 was created from the remaining segment between Camp Dodge and the Interstate. The November 19, 1958, Des Moines Tribune had a story about four more highway changes that had been approved by the Highway Commission. IA 64 was taken off its old alignment through Johnston (which incorporated in 1969) and put on IA 141 and I-35/80. IA 90 was removed from Grand Avenue and put on Hickman and Merle Hay Roads (in a redundant multiplex with US 6) to Douglas Avenue. US 6 and IA 90, meanwhile, switched routes between Dexter and I-35/80; US 6 followed the interstate to Hickman Road. Finally, the original alignment of IA 123 — which had followed 18th Street and Fleur Drive since the 1920s — was turned over to the city while the 1957 east-west extension of IA 123 along Army Post Road to the new I-35 remained for the time being.
On June 13, 1959, IA 60 was rerouted away from downtown as a new segment opened from Madrid to Granger. Part of the old 60, from Polk City to the intersection of 2nd & Euclid, became IA 415. IA 60 was then routed along IA 64/141 and I-35/80 to Army Post Road, and then it replaced what was left of IA 123 to US 65/69 (although IA 28 remained as a second number on part of Army Post until 1961). The relocation of IA 60 left City US 6 as the only signed highway through downtown. Maps vary as to how long City US 6 lasted. Except for Rand McNally, many cartographers showed it well into the 1960s, and Gousha showed it as late as 1976. The state highway maps from 1964 to 1968 marked it as a green line, labeled as "Business Route," on the Des Moines map. (Incidentally, part of City US 6 no longer exists. The block of Keo Way between 8th and 7th Streets downtown was removed in 1993 to make room for a Principal Financial Group office building. The segment east of 7th was renamed Watson Powell Jr. Way, after the former American Republic Insurance president, in 2000.)

In 1959, Polk County began renaming its rural roads to conform with the street numbering system in Des Moines. (In a way, they adopted an E-911 street numbering system before there was such a thing.) The old names are shown on the pre-1959 maps here if they are known. Modern names are shown in parentheses if the road is no longer a state highway, or if the old name of the road is not known.

I-35/80 opened from Merle Hay Road to East 14th Street on November 28, 1959, while the segment from East 14th to the exit between Colfax and Newton opened November 17, 1960. US 6 and IA 64 would be moved to the freeway, with IA 90 taking over US 6's old route and IA 401 replacing the freestanding segment of IA 64 along Merle Hay Road. However, the US 6/IA 90 swap was not made until August 9, 1961, as businesses along US 6 initially disliked the idea.

While I-80 and I-35 were becoming reality, work on a freeway through Des Moines began. Although we now know it as I-235, newspapers simply referred to it as "the freeway" during its planning stages. (It was officially named the MacVicar Freeway, after former mayors John MacVicar Sr. and Jr.; however, most people refer to it as "I-235" now.) By the end of 1962, a small segment between Cottage Grove Avenue and Keo Way had opened. (Since 2002, there is no longer any access to Cottage Grove from I-235.) By the end of 1963 that segment extended across the Des Moines River to East 6th Street, creating a bypass of downtown.
Why was I-80 shown further south than its present route in the 1959 and 1962 maps? Because the original proposed routing for I-80 was closer to the Raccoon River, and I-80 would have joined I-35 at the Grand Avenue cloverleaf interchange, which was why that interchange was built as a cloverleaf to begin with. The Highway Commission later realized that acquiring right-of-way along the original route was too expensive, so on October 2, 1963, the Highway Commission approved the relocation of I-80 on its present alignment between Dexter and I-35. The realigned I-80 tied in with I-235 into a new "West Mixmaster" interchange. When that segment of I-80 opened on December 13, 1966, US 6 was put back on its pre-1958 alignment after the Commission felt that the multiplex was unnecessary.

In 1965, US 65/69 was rerouted onto one-way streets near the junction of I-235. (Johnson Court, for those who don't know, is the name for the two diagonal streets that connect East 14th with East 15th.) While there had been some plans to put US 69 on I-35 when the Interstate was in the planning stages, US 69 was never rerouted.

Construction of Des Moines' share of the Interstate Highway System was progressing as the 1960s passed. A four-lane highway finally connected Des Moines and Ames as I-35 opened between the two cities on November 11, 1965. By the end of 1967, I-235 had been finished from 63rd Street to the "East Mixmaster" interchange with I-35 and I-80. Finally, the last segment of I-235 through West Des Moines opened on October 30, 1968. Some of the original signs at the "West Mixmaster" survived into the 21st century, as the ghosts of the I-35/IA 60 multiplex remained on southbound I-35 until the signs were replaced in mid-2007. Signs on eastbound I-80 that originally showed an I-35/I-80/IA 60 multiplex were replaced in early 2003. (Photos of these can be found on the Contributed Photos section of the Photo Gallery.)
The January 1, 1969, Great Renumbering brought two significant changes to Des Moines' highway system. IA 64 was removed from the Des Moines area (the standalone segment west of Grimes became IA 44), and the original IA 60 was decommissioned. The multiplexed segments with I-35 and IA 141 were dropped, Army Post Road became IA 5, and the standalone segment north of Granger became IA 17.

The 1970s were a relatively uneventful decade, as the only change to Des Moines' highway system was the 1970 relocation of US 65/69 from Bloomfield Road to a new four-lane road south of Army Post Road; by the end of 1971 that four-lane road extended southward into Indianola. In 1980, the DOT took over jurisdiction of 63rd Street, which had been a city street that straddled the western boundary of Des Moines and the eastern boundaries of Windsor Heights and West Des Moines. That road became an extension of IA 28. Although drivers wouldn't have noticed this, the DOT also assumed jurisdiction of three county roads that year; these roads appear in gray on the maps below. NE 94th Avenue between I-35 and US 65 became IA 931 (not shown), NE 72nd Street between IA 931 and I-80 became IA 945, and NE 56th Street between US 6/65 and IA 163 became IA 950. (IA 931 and 945 would be signed from 2000-2003, while IA 950 was given back to Polk County in 1994.) US 6 was moved onto I-80 from Altoona to Newton in 1980 (although the segment in Altoona remained under state control as IA 926 until 1987), while IA 90 was removed from the state highway system by the end of 1981.
Des Moines' highway system looked like the map above for most of the 1980s. After the city of Johnston took over Merle Hay Road north of I-35/80 on July 5, 1990, IA 401 was truncated before replaced by an extension of IA 28 along Hickman and Merle Hay Roads to I-35/80 in 1991.

Plans for a freeway loop around Des Moines were discussed as early as the 1960s, but construction on this 24-mile freeway would not begin until 1992. The first segment of the bypass, which had been proposed as "Freeway 500" in the 1970s, opened as a relocated US 65 on December 21, 1994. US 65 was temporarily multiplexed with IA 163 between East 14th Street and the end of the bypass. When the first segment of the bypass opened, US 6 was taken off Hubbell Avenue to follow US 65 along the bypass and I-80. However, this would be short-lived, as US 6 was put back on Hubbell less than two years later. (If you look at the right time of the day, you can see spots for two US highway shields on the signs for exit 141 along I-80.)
After the second segment of the bypass opened December 16, 1997, US 65 was taken off East 14th Street altogether, while IA 5 was put on US 69 between the temporary end of the freeway and Army Post Road. IA 46 was also nearing the end of its life. As the bridge across the Des Moines River was showing its age, the DOT announced in early 1998 that the bridge would be removed and IA 46 transferred to local jurisdictions. Once the bridge was removed, the segments of SE 45th Street south of Carlisle Road and north of SE 44th Avenue were closed to public access.

IA 5 was taken off Army Post Road east of IA 28 when the third segment of the freeway opened on January 12, 2001, but not before Army Post was relocated south of the airport to make room for future runway expansion. IA 28 was also realigned onto a new four-lane diagonal road in this area, first from McKinley Avenue to Army Post Road in 1995 and then from Army Post to Norwalk on August 11, 2000. Stubs of IA 28 that dead-end in both directions from Army Post Road and County Line Road remained in the state highway system as IA 296. The segment at Army Post Road was turned over in 2001, but the segment that is bisected by County Line Road remained part of the state highway system until sometime in 2010.

Finally, after the last segment of the IA 5 freeway opened on October 10, 2002, IA 5 was taken off Army Post Road altogether. (The last segment of Army Post Road became unsigned IA 331 and was transferred to West Des Moines, which annexed the area around IA 5 shortly after the freeway opened, by the end of 2005.) I-235, meanwhile, began an extensive reconstruction project that year that was completed in late 2007.

Alignment summaries
This section only covers post-1926 alignments, as alignments from 1920 to 1926 are unknown at this point. Active highways are shown in white cells, while decommissioned highways and highways that no longer run through Des Moines are shown in gray cells. These highways are covered in the main listings: I-35, I-80, I-235, IA 46 (II), IA 46 (III), IA 88 (I), IA 89 (I), IA 123, IA 132, IA 155 (I), IA 158, IA 401, IA 415, IA 945, and IA 950.
US 6
  • December 1, 1931: Replaced US 32 along Hickman Road, Beaver Avenue, Forest Avenue, 21st Street, Carpenter Avenue, Keosauqua Way, 7th Street (westbound)/9th Street (eastbound), Grand Avenue, Hubbell Avenue, and Broadway Avenue
  • May 3, 1932 (approved April 13): Westbound alignment, along with that of IA 7, shifted to follow 19th Street and Forest Avenue west of Keo Way; eastbound alignment continued to follow 21st and Carpenter
  • July 20, 1932: Westbound alignment shifted to follow 5th Avenue and Keo Way north of Grand Avenue
  • December 3, 1934: Moved onto Merle Hay Road, Douglas Avenue, and Euclid Avenue between Hickman Road and Hubbell Avenue. City US 6 was created out of its old alignment.
  • October 1950: Shift from Douglas to Euclid Avenue moved from Lower Beaver Road to a point west of Harding Road (now Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway). This change did not appear on state maps until 1959.
  • November 19, 1958: Moved onto the former IA 90 (Grand Avenue/Raccoon River Road) west of I-35, and onto I-35 from the Grand Avenue interchange northward to Hickman Road; IA 90 later replaced the old US 6 west of I-35.
  • August 9, 1961: Moved onto I-35 and I-80 between Hickman Road and the interchange between Colfax and Newton (the old alignment became IA 90)
  • December 13, 1966: Replaced IA 90 through Des Moines, following Hickman Road, Merle Hay Road, Douglas Avenue, Euclid Avenue, Hubbell Avenue, and Broadway Avenue (8th Street SW in Altoona)
  • 1980: Moved from Broadway/8th Street SW to Hubbell Avenue and I-80
  • December 21, 1994: Moved from Hubbell Avenue onto US 65 and I-80 after the first US 65 freeway segment opened; the city of Altoona took over that segment of Hubbell.
  • August 19, 1996: Moved back onto Hubbell Avenue (its pre-1994 alignment) between I-80 and US 65, after the state agreed to take back that segment from the city of Altoona.

  • Main US 6 listing
    US 32
  • October 16, 1926: Designated along Adel (now Ashworth) Road, Grand Avenue, Hubbell Avenue, and Broadway Avenue
  • November 19, 1931: Moved onto Hickman Road, Beaver Avenue, Forest Avenue, 21st Street, Carpenter Avenue, Keosauqua Way, and 9th Street (eastbound)/7th Street (westbound), where it resumed its previous alignment at Grand Avenue. It followed IA 7 south of Hickman; IA 90 replaced the segment along Grand.
  • December 1, 1931: Decommissioned; replaced by US 6

  • Main US 32 listing
    US 63/US 163
  • October 16, 1926: US 63 designated along Grand Avenue, East 30th Street, and University Avenue east of East 14th Street
  • December 20, 1933: US 163 moved to Hubbell and University Avenues east of the Grand/Hubbell Avenue split
  • December 1, 1934: US 63 replaced by US 163
  • 1938: US 163 decommissioned; replaced by IA 163

  • Main US 63 listing
    Main US 163 listing
    US 65
  • October 16, 1926: Designated along East 14th Street, Grand Avenue, 7th Street, and Indianola Avenue
  • Between 1926 and mid-1931 (date yet unknown): Rerouted onto 10th and Mulberry streets south of Grand Avenue after left turns were banned at the intersection of 7th and Grand
  • August 19, 1931: Southbound alignment shifted to follow 9th Street and Mulberry Street between Grand Avenue and 7th Street
  • July 20, 1932: Northbound alignment shifted to follow Mulberry Street and 5th Avenue between Grand and 7th.
  • November 30, 1937: Moved onto the new East 14th Street between Grand and Indianola Avenues (with US 69; IA 28 replaced part of the old alignment)
  • September 11, 1940: Moved onto Hubbell Avenue and Euclid Avenue east of East 14th Street (joining US 6 and IA 64)
  • August 1942 (approved July 28): Moved onto SE 14th Street and Bloomfield Road south of Indianola Avenue (with US 69)
  • September 16, 1965: Moved onto the East 14th (southbound) and East 15th Street/Johnson Court (northbound) one-way pair between Fremont Street and Court Avenue (with US 69)
  • October 1970: Moved from Bloomfield Road onto a new four-lane road south of Army Post Road (with US 69)
  • December 21, 1994: Moved onto I-80, a new freeway segment, and IA 163/East University Avenue east of East 14th Street
  • December 16, 1997: Moved onto new freeway segment between IA 163 and US 69

  • Main US 65 listing
    US 69
  • December 1934 (approved November 20): Designated along 9th Street (southbound)/5th Avenue (northbound), Mulberry Street, 7th Street, and Indianola Avenue, multiplexing with US 65 throughout. (It likely started at Grand Avenue, where US 65 turned to the east and US 6 followed before the Euclid Avenue bridge opened, although there are no sources to verify this.)
  • May 4, 1935 (approved March 27): Extended northward along Grand Avenue and East 14th Street, following US 65
  • November 30, 1937: Moved onto the new East 14th Street between Grand and Indianola Avenues (with US 65; IA 28 replaced part of the old alignment)
  • August 1942 (approved July 28): Moved onto SE 14th Street and Bloomfield Road south of Indianola Avenue (with US 65)
  • September 16, 1965: Moved onto the East 14th (southbound) and East 15th Street/Johnson Court (northbound) one-way pair between Fremont Street and Court Avenue (with US 65)
  • October 1970: Moved from Bloomfield Road onto a new four-lane road south of Army Post Road (with US 65)

  • Main US 69 listing
    Iowa 5
  • January 1, 1969: Designated along Army Post Road and SE 45th Street from its north end at I-35 (despite its east-west orientation in the Des Moines area, IA 5 is signed north-south)
  • December 16, 1997: Moved onto US 69 and the new US 65 freeway segment between the SE 14th Street/Army Post Road intersection and the Carlisle exit. The segment of old IA 5 south of Army Post Road dead-ends just before the freeway.
  • September 29, 1998: Army Post Road moved between SW 42nd Street and Fleur Drive to make room for future airport expansion. An extension of the new Army Post to the relocated IA 28 opened August 11, 2000.
  • January 12, 2001: Moved onto freeway segment between IA 28 and US 65/69, sharing IA 28 between Army Post Road and the temporary end of the freeway.
  • August 2001: Traffic to and from southbound I-35 moved onto new 1-mile freeway segment between I-35 and SW 96th Court. By September 2002, all traffic was rerouted onto the new interchange between I-35 and IA 5.
  • October 10, 2002: Moved onto freeway segment between SW 96th Court (now South 35th Street in West Des Moines) and IA 28

  • Main IA 5 listing
    Iowa 6
  • October 16, 1926: Designated along Grand Avenue, East 30th Street, Vandalia Road, SE 43rd Street, Carlisle Road, modern-day SE 45th Street, SE 72nd Avenue, and SE 52nd Street from the intersection of Grand and Hubbell Avenues into Carlisle
  • December 1931: Decommissioned; replaced by IA 60.

  • Main IA 6 (II) listing
    Iowa 7
  • October 16, 1926: Routed along modern-day NW 70th Avenue, Clive Road (now NW 86th Street), Johnston Road (now NW 62nd Avenue), Merle Hay Road, Douglas Avenue, Beaver Avenue, Forest Avenue, 21st Street, Carpenter Avenue, Keosauqua Way, and 7th Street to its east end at Grand Avenue.
  • August 19, 1931: Eastbound alignment shifted to follow 9th Street between Keo Way and Grand Avenue following the relocation of US 65. (It is uncertain whether westbound IA 7 traffic followed US 6 along 5th and Keo when US 6 was rerouted on July 20, 1932, considering that later maps showed IA 7 exclusively along 9th.)
  • May 3, 1932: Westbound alignment, along with that of US 6, shifted to follow 19th Street and Forest Avenue west of Keo Way; eastbound alignment continued to follow 21st and Carpenter.
  • July 22, 1939: Decommissioned. The segment northwest of the Merle Hay Road and Douglas Avenue intersection became part of IA 64, while the remaining standalone segments were turned over to the city.

  • Main IA 7 (I) listing
    Iowa 28
  • October 16, 1926: Designated along Clifton Avenue, SW 9th Street, Army Post Road, and Norwalk Road (now SW 42nd Street) from its north end at 7th Street.
  • November 30, 1937: Extended along 7th Street, Mulberry Street, and 9th Street (replacing part of US 65/69) to end at Grand Avenue
  • August 1942: Moved onto Army Post Road between Norwalk Road and SE 14th Street, with the old alignment becoming IA 46 (II).
  • August 23, 1961: Truncated north of the SW 42nd Street/Army Post Road intersection, as the redundant wrong-way multiplex with IA 60 was dropped
  • August 21, 1980: Extended from Army Post Road to Hickman Road (US 6) along Army Post (sharing it with IA 5) and 63rd Street.
  • March 12, 1991: Extended from the intersection of 63rd Street and Hickman Road to the interchange of I-35/80 and Merle Hay Road, sharing US 6 along Hickman and Merle Hay to Douglas Avenue and replacing IA 401 along Merle Hay north of Douglas.
  • 1995: Moved onto a new segment between McKinley Avenue and Army Post Road as a four-lane segment south of Grand Avenue opened
  • August 11, 2000: Moved onto a new diagonal four-lane segment between Army Post Road and Norwalk, creating the unsigned IA 296 out of two former segments

  • Main IA 28 listing
    Iowa 60
  • October 16, 1926: Routed along 6th Avenue to its south end at Grand Avenue
  • December 1931: Extended along Grand Avenue, East 30th Street, Vandalia Road, SE 43rd Street, Carlisle Road, modern-day SE 45th Street, SE 72nd Avenue, and SE 52nd Street from the intersection of Grand and Hubbell Avenues into Carlisle, replacing IA 6.
  • December 20, 1933: Moved from 4th Street to 2nd Street and Keo Way between Keo and Grand Avenue (it is unknown at this time when IA 60 was moved from 6th to 4th)
  • 1934: Moved from the present-day SE 72nd Avenue and SE 52nd Street to a relocated SE 45th Street. (The actual names of these roads at the time is unknown. Part of SE 72nd Avenue was removed in the mid-1990s to make room for the US 65 freeway.)
  • August 3, 1937: Moved from 6th to 2nd Avenue between Euclid Avenue and Keo Way
  • December 1942: Moved onto 2nd Avenue between the eventual junction with IA 160 south of Ankeny and Euclid Avenue
  • 1945: Moved onto University Avenue between 2nd Avenue and East 30th Street (sharing it with IA 163 east of East 14th Street)
  • July 29, 1953: Moved onto East 14th Street and Army Post Road south of University Avenue, creating IA 46 (III) out of part of its old alignment
  • June 13, 1959: Moved onto Army Post Road (replacing IA 123 and sharing IA 28 in a wrong-way multiplex) between I-35 and SE 14th Street. IA 415 replaced the old IA 60 north of the intersection of 2nd Street and Euclid Avenue, while the segment south of there was turned over to the city.
  • January 1, 1969: Decommissioned; replaced by IA 5

  • Main IA 60 (I) listing
    Iowa 64
  • July 22, 1939: Designated along present-day NW 70th Avenue, NW Clive Road (now NW 86th Street), Johnston Road (now NW 62nd Avenue), and Merle Hay Road, replacing IA 7; and Douglas Avenue, Euclid Avenue, and Hubbell Avenue (mostly with US 6)
  • November 19, 1958: Moved onto the new IA 141 and I-35/80 to Merle Hay Road
  • November 17, 1960: Moved onto I-80 between Merle Hay Road and US 65; the segment along Merle Hay between I-35/80 and Douglas Avenue became an extension of IA 401
  • January 1, 1969: Removed from the Des Moines area after it was truncated west of Anamosa

  • Main IA 64 listing
    Iowa 90
  • March 29, 1932: Designated along Grand Avenue from Commerce through Valley Junction (now West Des Moines) to the intersection of 7th Street and Grand Avenue. By 1936, it would be extended two blocks eastward to end at 9th Street (with IA 123).
  • 1934: Extended westward from Commerce to Booneville, reaching Dexter by the end of 1938.
  • November 30, 1937: East end moved to 2nd Street & Grand Avenue, following the relocation of US 65/69 onto East 14th Street
  • 1945: Extended from Grand Avenue to University Avenue along 2nd Avenue, replacing part of IA 60 upon realignment
  • February 15, 1953: Rerouted onto the Grand Avenue (eastbound)/Locust Street (westbound) one-way pairs between 18th Street/Fleur Drive and 2nd Avenue
  • November 19, 1958: Rerouted along Hickman Road and Merle Hay Road to the intersection of Merle Hay and Douglas Avenue. It replaced part of and shared part of US 6, which in turn was given old IA 90 west of I-35; the rest of old IA 90 was turned over to the cities of West Des Moines and Des Moines.
  • August 9, 1961: Extended eastward from Merle Hay Road along Douglas, Euclid, Hubbell, and Broadway Avenues, after US 6 had been rerouted onto I-80
  • December 13, 1966: Rerouted along Raccoon River Road and Grand Avenue to its new east end at I-35, as US 6 was put back on its old alignment.
  • 1981: Decommissioned; replaced by County Road F90

  • Main IA 90 (III) listing
    Iowa 141
  • April 1, 1941: Designated along present-day NW 110th Avenue, NW 121st Street, NW 106th Avenue, NW Beaver Drive, and Merle Hay Road to its east end at Douglas Avenue. (Despite its north-south orientation in the Des Moines area, IA 141 is signed east-west.) IA 141 replaced all of IA 89.
  • November 9, 1958: Relocated onto a new paved road between Granger and the interchange with I-35/80; the old alignment between Camp Dodge and I-35/80 became IA 401.

  • Main IA 141 listing
    Iowa 163
  • 1938: Replaced US 163 along Grand, Hubbell, and University Avenue east of East 14th Street
  • 1945: Moved onto University Avenue between East 14th and Hubbell
  • 1965: Shifted from old University Avenue onto new four-lane alignment in Pleasant Hill

  • Main IA 163 listing

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